How to Make Pumpkin Puree

Baking, Cook, Fall, How-To, In Season, Learn

Pumpkin puree is a key ingredient in fall pies, but it can also be used in breads, custards, ice creams, soups and a host of other dishes. If you’d rather skip the canned stuff, here’s how you can make it at home:

 

Roast the pumpkin

Place a small whole pumpkin on a baking sheet and roast it in a preheated 350°F oven until it can be easily pierced with a knife, 1 to 1 1/2 hours. For a shorter roasting time, slice the pumpkin in half and roast it, cut side down, in 1 inch of water in a baking dish until tender, about 45 minutes.

 

Scoop & puree

Let the pumpkin cool, then cut it in half crosswise (if not already done) and scoop out and discard the seeds. Scoop out the flesh with a large spoon and puree the flesh in a blender or food processor or with a food mill.

 

Now that you have the base ready, try these recipes featuring pumpkin puree. Substitute homemade puree for canned when applicable.

 

Pumpkin Pie Waffles Classic Pumpkin Pie 

 

 

 

Pumpkin Ice Cream
Pumpkin Soup  

with Sweet & Spicy Pumpkin Seeds

11 comments about “How to Make Pumpkin Puree

  1. Celeste

    Can you tell me approximately how much pulp you get from a certain weight or size of pumpkin? I’ve always wanted to try this, but end up using the canned puree. I have a wonderful pumpkin cheesecake recipe and would love to try it out with homemade puree.

    Reply
  2. Rebecca

    I always scoop the seeds out first, like you would make a jack o lantern, then roast. This gives seeds for roasting later. I go slower at 250 and let it go all day just keeping water in the pan. They’re done when they start to collapes or a fork goes into the meat with no resistance. I use the small pie pumpkins and do 5 or 6 at once. I probably get close to 2 cups per pumpkin, depending on how thick the meat is. I scoop them out once they’re done and either run thru the blender to use immediately or pack and freeze for later use.

    Reply
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  5. megan

    i roasted a couple of my rouge vif d’etemps pumpkins last year. Yhey were somewhat immature and as a result my puree turned out rather runny. Any suggestions on how to thicken it up? or what I can do with it as is? Thanks!

    Reply
  6. Olivia Ware

    Megan, I’d recommend cooking the pumpkin puree on the stove top and stirring frequently. You should be able to reduce the puree somewhat, thickening it — and if the pumpkin is immature that may also help you achieve a sweeter flavor. Good luck!

    Reply
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