These Are The Best Foods to Cook in a Nonstick Pan

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Just as we’d steer you towards a heavy, cast-iron pan for searing a porterhouse steak, certain tasks call out for the finesse granted by a nonstick skillet’s slick lining. It’s our pan of choice when delicate quick-cooking proteins are in play, like fish fillets and eggs. To get 18 ideas for what to cook in your nonstick pan, keep reading.

 

A couple notes before we get to the recipes: With rare exceptions, it’s important to properly preheat your nonstick skillet as it promotes even cooking, and at higher temperatures, browning. (This is especially important when using a nonstick skillet to sear.) When working with seafood or other solid proteins (as in, not eggs), be sure to also pat exposed surfaces dry shortly before you add them to the pan so that the outside will brown and crisp, rather than steam. These tips are good to keep in mind when using any kind of pan, but are especially important when working with nonstick skillets, as safety calls for cooking at temperatures below 450-500ºF.

Omelettes

Outfitted with a top-notch nonstick skillet (and a good recipe—see below), you’ll be turning out fluffy, golden omelettes like a seasoned line cook.

 

OmeletteClassic Diner-Style Omelettes

 

Tuck into a comforting diner-style omelette in the comfort of your own home with this customizable, step-by-step recipe.

 

 

 

Fava Bean & Ricotta Omelette with Spring Greens

 

Lighter than your typical omelette, this gorgeously green recipe is the right choice when something healthy is what you’re after.

 

 

 

Philly Cheesesteak Omelette

 

For a decadent, super-savory breakfast, consider a Philly cheesesteak omelette which sandwiches caramelized onions, thinly-sliced beef, roasted peppers, and provolone inside an omelette instead of a hoagie roll.

 

 

 

Pan-Seared Fish and Shellfish

Due to their lower fat content and delicate muscle structure, fishmonger favorites like salmon fillets and scallops are prone to sticking. A nonstick skillet goes a long way towards ensuring success with minimal stress.

 

Blackened Salmon Tacos With Spicy Cabbage

 

Moist, tender salmon, spicy cabbage slaw, and pineapple-jicama slaw combine forces for a flavor-packed taco. Or, for something a bit lighter, go the taco bowl route and serve it all atop a bed of brown rice.

 

 

 

Halibut With Lemons, Herbs, and Sautéed Asparagus

 

Lean, skinned fillets, like the halibut called for in this recipe, are especially delicate. Skip the stress and make this produce-packed one-pan dinner in a nonstick skillet.

 

 

 

Arugula and Fennel Salad With Black Pepper Crusted Tuna

 

For a lunch that’ll keep your taste buds guessing, try this salad of seared tuna, peppery arugula and fennel.

 

 

 

Seared Scallops With Warm Shredded Brussels Sprouts and Pancetta

 

Take any fear out of searing scallops by cooking them in a nonstick pan. Paired with pancetta and shredded brussels sprouts, it’ll soon become a go-to choice for wowing dinner guests.

 

 

 

Frittatas and Tortillas

Frittatas and tortillas can be cooked in a well-oiled cast-iron skillet, but we typically prefer to go the nonstick route for extra insurance (a slick nonstick finish is especially helpful for recipes that have you flip the frittata midway through). Do note that while some recipes are cooked entirely stovetop, many are finished in the oven, so be sure to use an oven-safe option, such as a Zwilling Forte nonstick fry pan, if that’s the case.  

 

Fontina, Chard and Green Olive Frittata

 

Packed with chard, briny olives, and Fontina, this recipe is an exceptional vegetarian brunch main.

 

 

 

Broccoli and Comte Frittata

 

Can’t decide between making a savory bread pudding and a frittata? There’s no need: this broccoli and Comte frittata is essentially a hybrid of the two, adding cubed baguette to the mix.

 

 

 

Tortilla Española

 

Essentially a Spanish potato-based frittata, tortilla Española marries eggs with smoked paprika, onions, cheese, and sliced potatoes for a bite that practically begs to be paired with a dish of olives and a glass of sherry.

 

 

 

Zucchini, Poblano and Goat Cheese Frittata

 

Creamy goat cheese and spicy chiles are two of our favorite additions to eggs; here the two combine forces for a breakfast with Southwestern flavor.  

 

 

Crepes

If you have the storage space and make crepes often, it may be worth investing in a shallow crepe pan, otherwise, a large nonstick skillet is more than up to the task of cooking these delicate, eggy pancakes.

 

Peaches and Cream Crepes

 

Breakfast doesn’t get much prettier (or tastier) than this summery stone fruit-stuffed start.

 

 

 

Buckwheat Crepes with Corn and Roasted Poblano Chiles

 

For a cross-cultural breakfast, consider this option which pairs a Breton-style buckwheat crepe (a.k.a. galette) with a cheesy South-of-the-border filling.

 

 

 

Sauteed Pear, Turkey & Brie Crepes

 

A little bit savory and a little bit sweet, this recipe is the best of both worlds, and makes for an excellent lunch when served with a green salad.

 

 

 

Banana Chocolate Crepes with Toasted Hazelnuts

 

An elevated take on the classic banana and Nutella crepe, this sweet treat is what dreams are made of.

 

 

 

Scrambled Eggs

Fluffy scrambled eggs require near-constant stirring and low-to-moderate heat. A heavyweight nonstick skillet provides enough heat retention to quickly-cooking vegetable fillings, and the delicacy needed to softly-set eggs.

 

Scrambled Eggs with Asparagus

 

When stalks of snappy asparagus are in season, hightail it to the market to gather ingredients for this simple, stellar scramble.

 

 

 

 

Texas-Style Migas with Ranchero Sauce

 

For a taste of Texas, serve up migas, a scramble of corn tortillas, chiles, tomatoes, and warm spices.

 

 

 

Farmers’ Market Scramble

 

Bursting with summer produce, this easy recipe can easily be adapted to whatever looks best at your market right now. Or, if you prefer to cook a recipe to a T, pick up the zucchini, tomatoes, and spinach that’s called for.

 

 

 

 

 

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